Developments over December 2017 and January 2018 may improve prospects for significant benefits to the user’s search experience in iDiscover.

Expanded your results beyond your collection in iDiscover, but hit the paywall as a result?  For some time now, you could hit your Open Access button bookmarklet and get delivery of an OA repository version.   Rather than extend search from outside with a tool, a new agreement should maximise search to discovery to delivery, dramatically decreasing the pain of that journey for users.   Over 2018, we should see the integration of Primo (iDiscover) with CORE, making available in the University’s discovery service many millions of records for OA research articles, following the new partnership of the CORE service with Ex Libris.

The agreement has been described on the JISC involve blog here:

The aggregated content includes metadata (currently 90m records) and open access research outputs hosted in CORE (currently 9m full text articles) from more than 3,600 repositories and over 10,000 journals in the UK and worldwide (currently 70 countries) and in 53 languages. The Open University’s activity with the OpenMinTeD project (providing connectors to publisher OA content from Elsevier, Springer, Frontiers and PLoS ) has also resulted in more OA content (1,831,977 full text items) in CORE.

Given that CORE, to our knowledge, is the largest aggregation of full text OA content, it makes sense that, as part of its strategy, content is surface in existing library search products. Therefore, the partnership between CORE and ProQuest to surface OA content from CORE within Ex Libris Primo and Ex Libris Summon is a positive first step towards this aim. CORE is also intending to integrate with other library search products to ensure a wider search experience across all library search products.

In terms of navigating the paywall, for too long the University’s user community has found the task of getting access to content just that – a task.  And no way should it be.   Though Ex Libris has provided multiple repositories as collections we have activated for searching in iDiscover, the integration with CORE (COnnecting REpositories) should be on another scale, outstripping current capabilities completely in terms of user expectations.  Of course, searchers may still well prefer to search where they know all research is open, but innovations like Unpaywall and the Open Access button, as the Jisc R&D project demonstrated late last year (its findings coinciding with the Ex Libris-CORE agreement), are already engendering potential for big changes in library discovery and Inter-Library Loan services.

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